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Canadian Wild Boar Movement Reporting Now Mandatory

30 July 2015
Manitoba Pork Council


Farm-Scape is sponsored by
Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork

FarmScape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council
and Sask Pork.

CANADA - Regulations under Canada’s Health of Animals Act that took effect just over one year ago for producers of domestic swine now apply to producers of farmed wild boar, writes Bruce Cochrane.

Since July of last year federal regulations have required both the shipper and receiver of domestic swine to report movements to the PigTrace Canada database and those same regulations took effect for farmed wild boar July 1 of this year.

Mark Ferguson, the manager of industry and policy analysis with the Saskatchewan Pork Development Board, says the regulations treat the two species exactly the same.

Mark Ferguson-Saskatchewan Pork Development Board:

Movement information must be reported within 7 days of departure and arrival by both the sender and receiver of the pigs and typically the movement information is reported to the PigTrace.Ca web site and database.

There's requirements for movement, reporting the movement and there's requirements for identification, which is the physical mark that you put on the animals.

Farm to farm movements in Canada for pigs, generally the animals don't need to be physically identified unless it's a sow or a boar, a bred pig.

However whenever you're moving animals, it's important that a manifest document accompany the pigs and that the movement is reported.

Pigs that are sent to slaughter or export must always be physically identified with either a slap tattoo or a tag bearing the farm's herd mark.

That's basically what the requirements have been over the last year for domesticated swine and the regulations treat the two species as exactly the same so, when you're moving animal to slaughter for wild boar, a tag with the herd mark on it or a slap tattoo with a herd mark on it, on the shoulder of the animal is an accepted form of identification, the same as with domesticated swine.

For information on getting set up with a herd mark and premises ID, Ferguson encourages wild boar producers to visit PigTrace.Ca or SaskPork.com or to call Sask Pork at (306) 244-7752.

ThePigSite News Desk

Top image via Shutterstock



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