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Swine Waste Odor Dispersion and Detection

by 5m Editor
17 September 2003, at 12:00am

URBANA — A study by an Illinois State Water Survey scientist indicates that elevating the level of discharge of odors from swine production facilities, such as a smokestack, would not greatly depreciate the level of odor.

Swine Waste Odor Dispersion and Detection - URBANA — A study by an Illinois State Water Survey scientist indicates that elevating the level of discharge of odors from swine production facilities, such as a smokestack, would not greatly depreciate the level of odor.
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However, the study also points to a more effective way to measure odor levels.

“The odor measurement tool developed, known as a ‘nanonose’ because its operation depends on nanometer-sized aerosol particles, shows promise for routine odor measurement,“ said Allen Williams, a professional scientist with the Survey.

Williams’s work was funded by the Illinois Council on Food and Agricultural Research’s (C-FAR) five-year $6 million project on swine odor and waste management. Williams and other researchers involved in the C-FAR project will present their findings Dec. 11-12 at the University of Illinois Pork Industry Conference in Champaign. Those interested in learning more about or attending the event should contact Gilbert Hollis at (217) 333-0013 or e-mail at: [email protected] .

Using various models to study the dispersion of odor transport and account for the effects of elevated sources and other factors, Williams and Water Survey collaborator Ho-Chun Huang found a key limitation on use of an elevated stack for discharge.

“The results of simulations for sources elevated up to 10 meters show that beyond approximately a kilometer from the source, the elevation has little effect on ground level odor concentrations,“ said Williams. “In a case where it is desirable to reduce the odor levels at a mile or so from the source, it is unlikely that releasing the odor from an elevated stack would be effective. As a practical matter, the elevated source would be more effective at distances out to several hundred meters from the source.“

Early trials indicate that the ‘nanonose’ device can be successful in accurately detecting odor levels. However, there are technical problems that need to be resolved, and today the device costs about $75,000 to produce and is much more difficult to operate than existing devices.

“However, a single analysis can be made in one minute after the instrument is set up and running,“ said Williams. “Potentially hundreds of samples could be done during a day compared to only a dozen or so with olfactometry, the existing method.“

Source: ACES News - 11th September 2003

5m Editor