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Industry must adopt a culture of continuous improvement

by 5m Editor
7 November 2003, at 12:00am

UK - If the British red meat industry doesn't seize the chance to save money it will be in danger of drowning in a sea of imports as it loses its competitive edge.

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National
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THE VOICE OF THE UK PIG INDUSTRY

NPA is active on members' behalf in Brussels & White-hall, and with pro-cessors, supermarkets & caterers – fighting for the growth and pros-perity of the UK pig industry.

That was the message from Red Meat Industry Forum chairman Peter Barr at the close of a major conference in London. Mr Barr said the work of the RMIF had already resulted in clear cost savings all along the production chain from farm gate to plate - amounting to as much as 10 per cent.

He said: "Improvements can be made to all types and sizes of businesses - a point made by the speakers at the conference. Industry must adopt a culture of continuous improvement. Our competitors will not stand still, neither should we."

Mr Barr said the Government had provided support to roll out key business improvement programmes such as Metrics, benchmarking and Masterclasses but the funding would not be indefinite and good use must be made of it.

Almost 500 people from all sectors of the industry attended the conference, held at the QE II Conference Centre in London. One of the many highlights of the event was a video presentation looking at where the industry will be in 10 years.

Mr Barr said: "The RMIF has already delivered on its promise and the changes are clearly having an effect, something demonstrated by those who were willing to stand up in front of a large audience and talk about their experiences."

Source: National Pig Association - 6th November 2003

5m Editor