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United States Animal Identification Work Plan - Swine

by 5m Editor
10 May 2004, at 12:00am

By The US Animal Identification Program - The United States Animal Identification Plan defines the standards and framework for implementing a phased-in national animal identification system. Its goal is to achieve a traceback system that can identify all animals and premises potentially exposed to an animal with a Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) within 48 hours after discovery. Achieving this goal will enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of current animal health regulatory programs. This Plan currently includes all domestic cattle, bison, swine, sheep, goats, cervids (deer and elk), equine, poultry, game birds, aquaculture, camelids (llamas, alpacas, etc.), ratites (ostriches, emu's, etc.).

United States Animal Identification Work Plan - Swine - By The US Animal Identification Program - The United States Animal Identification Plan defines the standards and framework for implementing a phased-in national animal identification system. Its goal is to achieve a traceback system that can identify all animals and premises potentially exposed to an animal with a Foreign Animal Disease (FAD) within 48 hours after discovery. Achieving this goal will enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of current animal health regulatory programs. This Plan currently includes all domestic cattle, bison, swine, sheep, goats, cervids (deer and elk), equine, poultry, game birds, aquaculture, camelids (llamas, alpacas, etc.), ratites (ostriches, emu's, etc.).

V. B. 2. Swine

The swine industry has had mandatory identification requirements since 1988. These requirements encompass swine movements in interstate commerce and interstate swine movements within a production system. In addition, market swine are identified back to their owner at federally inspected plants.

Thus, in regards to swine identification, interstate movements are already being tracked. It should also be recognized that most market swine are tracked as groups for production management purposes and detailed group movement records exist locally today. Although most producers track group movements, a standard for Group/Lot ID will provide other producers with a mechanism to adopt this concept, give this valid swine identification method national credibility, and embrace the National Premises ID System.

Three phases are recommended to improve traceback / trace forward in pork production for disease management purposes and are illustrated in the following charts.

Phase I – Premises ID Phase I provides for the implementation of the National Premises Identification System. This will allow the swine industry to enhance identification of culled breeder swine and market swine to the last premises. Phase I will also address improvements that can be made in swine identification for the purpose of disease management. For the breeding herd, Phase I will require, as a minimum, the application of an ear tag with visual premises identification in all replacement breeder swine as they enter the breeding herd. The replacement breeder swine suppliers and/or breeding herd managers may prefer to use official individual identification devices with the US Animal Identification Number (USAIN) for breeder animals. However, for disease management purposes, it is imperative that the “last premises“ ID is readily available. A premises ID tag may be administered to replacement breeding stock in addition to an existing USAIN.

Phase I for the identification of market swine to their last premises will be accomplished with two options:

  1. All premises with market swine will have their unique national US Premises ID Number printed in bar code format on sheets of adhesive labels. Alternatively, the bar codes can be printed on the actual travel documents. Regardless, the premises ID will be a part of the travel documents as animals are marketed and presented to the packer/processor at delivery. Upon arrival to the packer/processor, the premises ID bar code is scanned linking the lot tattoo number and owner to the premises ID.

  2. Pork producers can use the official individual identification devices with the US Animal Identification Number on each pig if that system provides the “last premises“ identification. If not, then Option 1 is preferred for optimal disease management purposes. Implementation Date: July 2004

Phase II – Group/Lot ID

9CFR 71.19 provides for the interstate movement of groups/lots of pigs within a production system based on specified production record requirements, written agreements with state animal health officials and regular veterinary inspections. 9CFR 71.19 confirms USDA’s recognition of pork production records maintained locally as adequate identification for pigs. Pork producers will be allowed to continue pig movement and tracking under this rule. As described in the standards, Group/Lot ID (G/L ID) will be a combination of the US Premises ID Number identifying the location where the group was created and the date the group was established. Group/Lot definitions and details are described in the Standards section of this document.

The G/L ID standards will be required of all pork producers using Group/Lot ID. The recording and maintenance of those data will occur at the local level and be made available to USDA in the event of a significant animal health event. In the future when the resources, confidentiality assurances, and value become a reality, the transition to reporting Group/Lot movements to a national repository can occur seamlessly. Implementation: July 2004

Electronic Data Collection
As with the USAIN, an electronic data collection system will be designed to ensure Group/Lot data accuracy and minimize burdens on producers to record and report data. Implementation: July 2005

Phase III – Tracking

Although animal tracking can occur at the local level, the reporting of animal movements and locations provides the necessary data to accomplish animal tracking in a single database at a national level.

Electronic Reporting Interstate Movements
The interstate movements of swine are reported through the integration of the Electronic Certificates of Veterinary Inspection Interstate Health Certificates Implementation Target Date: July 2005

Electronic Reporting Intrastate and Interstate Movements
The intrastate and interstate movement of swine is reported through the integration of the Electronic Certificates of Veterinary Inspection Interstate Health Certificates. Implementation Target Date: July 2006, except as provided by 9CFR71.19.

Note: At this time the need to report swine group/lot movements where no change in ownership has occurred to a national repository requires a demonstration of added value and assurances of confidentiality and security.

To read the full report, please click here. (PDF Format, 74 pages)

Source: US Animal Identification Program - April 2004

US Animal Identification Program

5m Editor