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NPPC Voices Concern Over Proposed Canadian Ban of Carbadox

by 5m Editor
22 August 2006, at 10:42am

CANADA - Farm-Scape: Episode 2220. Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork.

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Farm-Scape, Episode 2220

The US based National Pork Producers Council is expressing its concern over a Health Canada proposal to further restrict the use of Carbadox in Canada.

Carbadox is an antibiotic used to protect against swine dysentery in the nursery phase. It was authorized for use in Canada in the early 1970’s but in 2001 Health Canada issued a stop sale order on the product and in 2004 its drug identification numbers were withdrawn.

Now Health Canada is proposing to further restrict its use to ensure no residues of the drug or its metabolites end up in pork products. National Pork Producers Council president Joy Philippi notes Carbadox has been approved for use for 35 years and she's convinced its 42 day withdrawal period is sufficient to guard against residues.

"Carbadox is actually fed in the earlier stages of life for pigs and we know, because of the 42 day withdrawal period, there's no residue from that drug in the meat at slaughter.

What's been brought forward is, there's been discussion whether meat that has been fed Carbadox could go to Canada. If we can not export meat into Canada that's been fed Carbadox, it'll have a tremendous impact on the US pork industry as far as our economic viability.

If Canada does decide to ban the imports of the animal or meat treated with Carbadox, it’s not going to be in accordance with the WTO agreement on the application of sanitary and phytosanitary measures and it's also going to be an issue when we talk about the North American FTA and we just don't feel that it's necessary to let it go to the length to end up being a trade problem."

Philippi suggests US pork producers would be prepared to accept stricter testing standards but, she insists, to completely eliminate this drug could be really tough on everybody.

Staff Farmscape.Ca

5m Editor