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KVD Requirements Restrict Registration of New Winter Wheat Varieties

by 5m Editor
5 September 2006, at 12:01pm

CANADA - Farm-Scape: Episode 2237. Farm-Scape is a Wonderworks Canada production and is distributed courtesy of Manitoba Pork Council and Sask Pork.

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Farm-Scape, Episode 2237

A University of Saskatchewan winter wheat breeder fears planned changes to kernel visual distinction requirements for the registration of new wheat varieties in Canada will do little to clear the way for the registration of improved varieties of winter wheat.

In June the Canadian Grain Commission announced plans to restructure western Canadian wheat classes to facilitate the registration of non-milling wheat varieties.

Key changes intended to take effect August 1, 2008, will include the creation of a new classification of wheat and the elimination of kernel visual distinction requirements for the minor classes but KVD requirements for red spring and durum wheats will remain in place.

Dr. Brian Fowler, a winter wheat breeder with the University of Saskatchewan and coordinator of the Central Hard Red Winter Wheat Coop Test, says KVD restrictions on mixtures of hard red spring wheat with the other classes is where the largest problem is.

The big problem is in our ability to register because, in order to register a variety, it has to meet KVD standards. I can't talk for the other classes but I can certainly talk for winter wheat.

Since 2002 we have not had a single entry that has survived the registration process in winter wheat. They've all been eliminated because of apparent KVD problems which are mixing of red winter and hard red spring wheat kernel types and so the KVD has essentially negated all plant breeding efforts in the hard red winter wheat area for at least four years.

Dr. Fowler admits over the years that he has been releasing new winter wheat varieties in the US where they have been accepted without penalty. He notes these same varieties are being penalized in Canada and in some cases couldn’t even be registered.

Staff Farmscape.Ca

5m Editor