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Approval for Camelina Meal in Livestock Feeds

by 5m Editor
25 September 2008, at 9:21am

US - Sustainable Oils has received regulatory approval for feeding camelina meal in diets for cattle and pigs.

Sustainable Oils says it has reached a key milestone in its efforts to build camelina production and marketing opportunities for Montana farmers. The company received approval from the Center for Veterinary Medicine, a department of the Federal Drug Administration, for the use of camelina meal in the diets of feedlot beef cattle and growing swine up to 2 percent of the weight of the total ration.

Camelina meal is a by-product of camelina oil extraction.

Sustainable Oils is a joint-venture between Targeted Growth and Green Earth Fuels, was launched in late 2007 and is focused on the research, development and commercialization of camelina for biodiesel production.

Camelina, a distant relative to canola, requires minimal water and can be harvested with traditional equipment. Because of these properties, it can be grown on fallow ground or as a rotation crop. Therefore, it is not competitive with traditional food crops but instead creates a 'food-plus-fuels' scenario.

"This is an important step in the process of developing a strong, sustainable market for camelina production," said Steve Sandroni, production and logistics manager, Sustainable Oils. "Opening up the livestock feed opportunities for camelina meal provides a market for the most significant by-product of camelina oil production."

"Especially at a time when livestock feeders are battling high input prices, camelina meal can be a very attractive option," he continued. "The meal is an excellent source of protein. With protein levels of 40 per cent or more, it is similar to soybean meal but offers the added benefit of being high in omega-3 fatty acids."

Sustainable Oils is leading the formation of an industry coalition working to obtain 'Generally Recognized As Safe' (GRAS) certification from the Food and Drug Administration so all producers can sell camelina meal.

It is one of two companies who have approval to sell camelina meal.

A nutritionist knowledgeable about the use of camelina must be consulted in developing rations using the product, the company recommends.

5m Editor