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EU Pig Prices: Basic Mood is Positive

by 5m Editor
2 November 2010, at 1:08am

EU - This week, the European slaughter pig market appears to be in a friendly to steady mood.

There’s no trace whatsoever of dim autumn feel at the market. Germany was mostly optimistic, where the quotation went up by a perceptible 3 cents. Due do increasing slaughter weights, the quantities of live pigs on offer are going down as a result of manifold new forms being implemented. On top of that, the pigs-mature-for-slaughter market moves around a little in the wake of the beef market which currently benefits from the flourishing export business with Turkey. This price increase given, Germany now clearly stands out from the Danish, French and Dutch quotations. Thus, the German pig price does only fall slightly below the Spanish quotation, which sagged in a marginal way. In the Netherlands, the quotation proves to be no more than just a correction of last week’s 1-cent decrease. So, the Dutch producers’ protesting and their discontent of the price structure did not have any effect.

The quotations remained unchanged in Denmark, Belgium, Austria, Great Britain and Sweden. The latter two reported on price movements only as a result of exchange rate changes. There is a tendency of weakness in France, Poland and the Czech Republic. As a consequence of a public holiday on 1 November, the French and Spanish are missing a day of slaughter. The financial situation is embarrassing for the pig producers, so the French Minister of Agriculture now demands the export reimbursement for pork to be reintroduced.

Market trend for Germany: Altogether, the basic mood on the pigs-mature-for-slaughter market is said to be positive. Supply is not expected to be expanded, and there is talk of the slaughter companies’ demand for live pigs to be expected to last. Considering the increased production costs, the producers certainly wish for the price to go on increasing. The meat processing companies, however, do not show to be ready for that as a consequence of the public holiday celebrated in some German federal states on 1 November.

Week D NL DK B F PL CZ IT ESP AUT GB SWE IR
Week 37 1,376 € 1,331 € 1,380 € 1,359 € 1,408 € 1,448 € 1,461 € 1,595 € 1,483 € 1,284 € 1,589 € 1,251 € 1,305 €
Week 38 1,336 € 1,302 € 1,353 € 1,334 € 1,399 € 1,444 € 1,442 € 1,595 € 1,470 € 1,243 € 1,542 € 1,247 € 1,305 €
Week 39 1,316 € 1,273 € 1,325 € 1,310 € 1,352 € 1,444 € 1,434 € 1,595 € 1,437 € 1,222 € 1,488 € 1,250 € 1,305 €
Week 40 1,316 € 1,273 € 1,325 € 1,310 € 1,321 € 1,444 € 1,402 € 1,570 € 1,392 € 1,222 € 1,441 € 1,248 € 1,305 €
Week 41 1,316 € 1,273 € 1,325 € 1,310 € 1,319 € 1,328 € 1,397 € 1,544 € 1,364 € 1,222 € 1,429 € 1,260 € 1,305 €
Week 42 1,316 € 1,273 € 1,325 € 1,310 € 1,317 € 1,340 € 1,395 € 1,519 € 1,359 € 1,222 € 1,425 € 1,273 € 1,286 €
Week 43 1,316 € 1,264 € 1,324 € 1,310 € 1,314 € 1,468 € 1,359 € 1,222 € 1,425 € 1,269 € 1,286 €
Week 44 1,316 € 1,264 € 1,324 € 1,310 € 1,314 € 1,468 € 1,359 € 1,222 € 1,425 € 1,269 € 1,286 €


Explanation
1corrected quotation: The official Quotations of the different countries are corrected, so that each quotation has the same base (conditions).
base: 56 per cent lean meat; farm-gate-price; 79 per cent killing out percentage, without value-added-tax (VAT)