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Salmonella Control Needed at All Stages

by 5m Editor
2 August 2010, at 12:28am

THAILAND - Salmonella was detected in 56 per cent of freshly cut pork, 71 per cent of transported pork and 35 per cent of retail products in a new study, indicating a need to control Salmonella at all stages of production.

A cross-sectional study of Salmonella in pork products in Chiang Mai was carried out by Arsooth Sanguankiat of Chiang Mai University and colleagues there and at Berlin's Free University, and published in the journal, Foodborne Pathogens and Disease.

The researchers explain that the occurrence of Salmonella in food of animal origin in Chiang Mai province was investigated by using a cross-sectional study during several phases of the pork production chain (cutting, transport and retail) and of the environment in the cutting unit of a slaughterhouse.

In total, 173 pork samples were obtained during the cutting phase, 173 samples from transported pork, 200 samples from retail products, and 300 samples from the slaughterhouse environment.

Salmonella was detected in 55.5 per cent of freshly cut pork, 70.5 per cent of transported pork and 34.5 per cent of retail products. The five most prevalent Salmonella serotypes identified were Rissen (45.3 per cent), Typhimurium (16.3 per cent), Krefeld (10.6 per cent), Stanley (6.3 per cent) and Lagos (6.0 per cent).

Carcass contamination prior to cutting and in the slaughterhouse environment appeared to be important sources of Salmonella in transported pork and retail products.

As Salmonella was also found during early stages of the slaughter process, attention should focus on all stages of the pork production chain to reduce contamination level and consumer risk of infection.

Reference

Sanguankiat A., R. Pinthong, P. Padungtod, M.P.O. Baumann, K-H. Zessin, L. Srikitjakarn and R. Fries. A Cross-Sectional Study of Salmonella in Pork Products in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease. August 2010, 7(8): 873-878. doi:10.1089/fpd.2009.0436.

Further Reading

- You can view the full report (fee payable) by clicking here.