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Slovakia Pork Industry Overview, August 2004

by 5m Editor
1 September 2004, at 12:00am

By USDA Foreign Agricultural Service - This article provides the pork industry data from the USDA FAS Livestock and Products Annual 2004 report for Slovakia. A link to the full report is also provided. The full report include all the tabular data which we have omitted from this article.

Report Highlights

Slovak pork production decreased by 5.7 percent in 2003 with the total number of pigs decreasing by 7.1 percent in 2003. Slightly lower pig production is estimated for 2004. While the total number of cattle went down by 2.4 percent, the number of suckler cows increased by 4.6 percent in 2003. This trend is also expected to continue in 2004. Poultry production decreased slightly in 2003 by 0.9 percent. However, rising numbers are expected for 2004. Sheep production was and is fairly stable.

Animal and Meat Production in Slovakia

Slovak pork production decreased by 5.7 percent in 2003 with the total number of pigs decreasing by 7.1 percent in 2003. Slightly lower pig production is estimated for 2004. While the total number of cattle went down by 2.4 percent, the number of suckler cows increased by 4.6 percent in 2003. This trend is also expected to continue in 2004. Poultry production decreased slightly in 2003 by 0.9 percent. However, rising numbers are expected for 2004. Sheep production was and is fairly stable.

The 2002 production of animal commodities increased due to a number of factors. The longterm targeted support schemes increased the production and sale of most animal products. From 2001 to 2002 the output of animal products increased between 0.7 percent (slaughter pigs) to 17.5 percent (slaughter calves).

Prices of animal products declined in 2002 by 0.6 percent on average. This decline was particularly influenced by cheap imports from China and the Czech Republic.

Swine

Due to a surplus of slaughter pigs in Slovakia (and the EU) and the relatively low purchasing power in Slovakia, Slovak pig producers are facing problems with their sales of pigs and pig meat. Even though there was an increase of pig numbers at the beginning of 2003, a consequent decline of pig numbers could be found in the second half of the year. This was due to reproductive and productive indicators.

At the end of 2003, total number of pigs amounted to 1,443 thousand heads. This corresponds with a decrease of 110.9 thousand heads (or 7.1 percent). Out of that number, 105.2 thousand were sows, which is 12.3 thousand heads (or 10.5 percent) less than the previous year.

Total number of pigs for fattening amounted to 641.7 thousand heads in 2003. This means 38.9 thousand heads (or 5.7 percent) less than in 2002. The number of pigs up to 20 kg was down by 9.2 percent (36.6 thousand heads) and reached a total number of 363.2 thousand heads.

Total production of slaughter pigs in 2003 accounted for 232,166 MT of live weight. This is 2.3 percent more than in the year before. Out of that number, 182,166 MT of live weight was sold (plus 4.3 percent compared to 2002) and around 50,000 MT was used for selfsupply (4.3 percent less than in 2002).

Meat, Pork

In 2003, imports of pigs and pig meat amounted to 12,946 MT (a decrease of 25.4 percent compared to 2002, however the number is expected to rise again in 2004 up to 16,000 MT). Slovak exports of pigs and pig meat are marginal. In 2003, Slovak per capita consumption amounted to 31.2 kg per capita and year (0.1 kg less than in 2002).

In comparison to 2002, the average annual price of slaughter pigs of quality class E decreased by 11.17 SKK (US$ 0.30) per kg of slaughter weight (a 17 percent decrease). Processor prices and consumer prices were lower by 10.5 to 15 percent and 10.2 to 12.2 percent respectively in 2003 compared to the previous year. Slovak pig breeders estimate their sales losses in 2003 for 1.2 billion SKK (US$ 30.3 million).

To view the full report, please click here (PDF)

Source: USDA Foreign Agricultural Service - August 2004