ShapeShapeauthorShapechevroncrossShapeShapeShapeGrouphamburgerhomeGroupmagnifyShapeShapeShaperssShape
Sponsor message
Mycotoxins in Swine Production 2nd Edition now available
Download e-book now

Solving rural conflicts

by 5m Editor
8 June 2003, at 12:00am

By Clare Illingworth, Ontario Pork Newsletter - Better communication between people living in the country and nearby farm operations is the key to resolving conflicts about rural issues, says University of Guelph researcher Wayne Caldwell.

Information provided courtsey Ontario Pork Ontario Pork Logo

June 2003 Newsletter

Higher Dollar Lowers Ontario Hog Prices

OPGA Fee Reduction

One Needle is Too Many

Looking for Young Ambassadors

Students dig in to learn about the environment on a pig farm

A new Price Series for Ontario Hog Producers

He's developing a framework along with Rural Studies graduate student Jennifer Ball to help community advisory boards resolve conflicts, many of which stem from concentrated livestock farming operations.

Better communication between people living in the country and nearby farm operations is the key to resolving conflicts about rural issues, says University of Guelph researcher Wayne Caldwell. He's developing a framework along with Rural Studies graduate student Jennifer Ball to help community advisory boards resolve conflicts, many of which stem from concentrated livestock farming operations.

Caldwell, Department of Environmental Design and Rural Planning, is designing a volunteer-based framework to intercede between rural farmers and their close neighbors. His vision is that community advisory boards will allow people to talk through a problem, and in many cases eliminate the potential for court involvement.

"Conflicts within communities may be better resolved through communicating rather than courts," says Caldwell. "These advisory boards will allow farmers and their neighbors a practical and efficient way to deal with issues."

The Walkerton E. coli outbreak encouraged the provincial government to focus on issues related to rural-urban coexistence. This was reflected in Bill 81 that outlines specifications for nutrient management, minimum distances from specific farming operations, and land-use policies.

Caldwell and his research team noted that Bill 81 could serve as a guide to resolve disagreement in these rural areas. The Bill recognized the need for advisory boards; this research project, using Huron and Perth's already existing boards as a model, will contribute to the spread of this approach across the province.

"Farm intensification often causes angst with non-farming neighbours," says Caldwell. "A romantic vision of living in the country doesn't include the smell of manure and flies in the air, and noisy combines on the fields."

Source: Ontario Pork, June 2003

Clare Illingworth is a student writer with the University of Guelph's SPARK writing program.

Sponsored content
Mycotoxins in Swine Production

The impact of mycotoxins — through losses in commodity quality and livestock health — exceeds $1.4 billion in the United States alone, according to the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology. This guide includes:

  • An overview of different types of mycotoxins
  • Understanding of the effects of mycotoxicoses in swine
  • Instructions on how to analyze mycotoxin content in commodities and feeds
  • Innovative ways of combatting mycotoxins and their effects
Download e-book now