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The Revised USDA Nutrient Data Set for Fresh Pork

by 5m Editor
29 June 2006, at 12:00am

By Juliette C. Howe, Denise Trainer, Joanne M. Holden, Dennis R. Buege, Juhi R. Williams, Ceci Snyder, Karen Boillot, and Phil Lofgren and published by the USDA's Agricultural Research Service - Nutrient composition data for fresh pork products in the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR) have not been updated since 1991. Since that time, changes in animal husbandry practices and industry procedures have led to the availability of leaner cuts.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Methods and Procedures
    • Sampling
    • Cooking procedures
    • Sample preparation – raw and cooked products
    • Sample composites – raw and cooked
    • Nutrient analyses
    • Data processing
    • Table format
  • Data Dissemination
  • References
  • Acknowledgement
  • The Revised USDA Nutrient Data Set for Fresh Pork
  • Appendix A
  • Appendix B
  • Appendix C
  • Appendix D

Introduction

Furthermore, the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) has proposed labeling regulations for fresh, single-ingredient meats. In order to provide up-to-date nutrient information on fresh pork products in SR, the USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL), in collaboration with scientists at the University of Wisconsin and the National Pork Board, conducted a study to determine the nutrient composition of nine (9) fresh pork cuts.

The cuts chosen for evaluation were bone-in shoulder blade steak, boneless tenderloin roast, boneless top loin chop, boneless top loin roast, bone-in sirloin roast, bone-in center loin chop, bone-in center rib chop, bone-in country-style ribs, and bone-in spare ribs.

They were analyzed both in the raw and cooked states by the most commonly used cooking method for each cut. To assist industry in preparing for the proposed new labeling regulations, these data are being presented as a separate release.

Further Information

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Source: USDA's Agricultural Research Service - June 2006